Haunted by Resonance: A review of General Escobar’s War.

In light of what happened in Charlotteville, VA and is happening now in various spots around the country, I feel compelled to reblog this review.

MichaelNicholasRichard

general-escobars-war

As I write this, it is the eve of the 2016 election. And I am haunted.

Imagine a time when a nation is being pulled apart by hostile agendas, uncompromising political forces demonize one another and there seems to be no clear choice for people who value the rule of law, their faith, and honor.

Imagine a time when secular “isms” demand a dogmatic, unquestioning loyalty that matches and even exceeds religious zealotry.

Imagine a time when households are divided by political fury.

It sounds alarmingly recent, but it is the stage for General Escobar’s War  a novel by Jose Luis Olaizola, written not in 2016 but in 1983 concerning events of the Spanish Civil War occurring in 1936-39. A historical novel based on the papers of Antonio Escobar Huerta. A true story.

It might seem the most manipulative hyperbole to compare the events of the Spanish CIvil War to…

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New bishop appointed for Diocese of Raleigh

http://whispersintheloggia.blogspot.com/2017/07/for-new-cathedral-un-nuevo-obispo-at.html

 

Finally. He seems a gentle and pastoral leader. An auxiliary bishop of Atlanta, Luis Zarama becomes the first Latino to lead a diocese in the Southeast outside of Florida.

WRAL video:

http://www.wral.com/pope-taps-atlanta-bishop-to-lead-raleigh-diocese/16802399/http://www.wral.com/pope-taps-atlanta-bishop-to-lead-raleigh-diocese/16802399/

 

Seven worthy minutes.

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I am not sure how to review a film that is seven minutes long,  except to say it is probably well worth every minute.

Available in its entirety on vimeo: https://vimeo.com/119995069

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01KIQ9KWY/ref=s9u_simh_gw_i1?ie=UTF8&fpl=fresh&pd_rd_i=B01KIQ9KWY&pd_rd_r=JKJG871YYFR4MZJ8N3V0&pd_rd_w=5eYFA&pd_rd_wg=0JA8a&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=&pf_rd_r=RGYTF21G52WZKZ64JFBN&pf_rd_t=36701&pf_rd_p=781f4767-b4d4-466b-8c26-2639359664eb&pf_rd_i=desktop

A Life Well Lived

Michael Novak, philosopher, journalist, novelist, and diplomat died this past February 17th. For some reason I only ever read one of his books, No One Sees God: The Dark Night of Atheists and Believers, but it was certainly instrumental in deepening my reawakened faith.

I consider No One Sees God to be a work of genius. There is nothing new or groundbreaking in the book, but the crafting of it was superb. Novak presented such a coherent  intellectual vision of a thinking man’s faith that I found myself thinking “yes, that’s it” over and again. Part apologia and part dialog, the book helped me give structure to my own thoughts. I have read it from cover to cover more than once, and have read sections of it even more often than that.

I’m not sure why I never got around to reading another of his works. I’m fairly certain I would not connect so intimately to all his work as I did with No One Sees God, but surely I would have found fresh ground for pondering.

The wiki entry on Michael Novak gives an idea of just how full was his life.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Novak

And No One Sees God: The Dark Night of Atheists and Believers is available in both print and kindle version on amazon.com

Haunted by Resonance: A review of General Escobar’s War.

general-escobars-war

 

As I write this, it is the eve of the 2016 election. And I am haunted.

Imagine a time when a nation is being pulled apart by hostile agendas, uncompromising political forces demonize one another and there seems to be no clear choice for people who value the rule of law, their faith, and honor.

Imagine a time when secular “isms” demand a dogmatic, unquestioning loyalty that matches and even exceeds religious zealotry.

Imagine a time when households are divided by political fury.

It sounds alarmingly recent, but it is the stage for General Escobar’s War  a novel by Jose Luis Olaizola, written not in 2016 but in 1983 concerning events of the Spanish Civil War occurring in 1936-39. A historical novel based on the papers of Antonio Escobar Huerta. A true story.

It might seem the most manipulative hyperbole to compare the events of the Spanish CIvil War to the dissonance of the current American political dynamic. Yet, the events of that struggle would probably have seemed like hyperbole had they been suggested ten or fifteen years before they occurred

Reading this novel created an all too unnerving echo of what we can see happening around us today. The situation today may not be as complicated or dire, just yet, as the events of 1936-39, but the resonance is there. It is not at this time as harsh, but it is distressing to see the growing tension not just between political agendas, but the schism from that tension infecting families.

There is a weight of fatalistic sorrow in General Escobar’s War that would soon become oppressive were it not for the title character’s steadfast nature. Antonio Escobar Huerta is no cardboard hero. He worries. He frets. He experiences dread, fear, hope, anger and uncertainty. But, through it all he holds fast to faith and honor. In short he is a man who senses a reality beyond the immediate. The good General Escobar realizes that surrendering what is moral and honorable is to lose anything that truly matters.

Such a realization is beyond inconvenient. As readers it might be disquieting for us to contemplate. For General Escobar it was a doom. So read this book. Ponder if you would ever dare bring down such a doom upon yourself for the sake of those virtues that are the mortar of our “sure and certain hope.”  I believe that you too will be grateful that there have been men and women like Antonio Escobar Huerta scattered throughout our history..

You might also find yourself praying that they are among us still.

 

 

The Esotericism of the Hooded Merganser

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My friend, Steven, had a jackdaw mind for the quirky.  He was to the quirky as the family Corvidae is to bright, shiny objects. Cars, entertainment, humor and even names, he liked them quirky. He collected the knowledge of them and stored them in his mind for later recollection.

 

His love of quirky names still stands out for me in how he latched on to dwarf nandina and hooded merganser. Every unknown plant was granted the appellation dwarf nandina, and every unknown waterfowl was a hooded merganser.  An actual hood was not required.

 

I was reading Michael D. O’Brien’s The Fool of New York City when my own memories of my friend were stirred. Some elements of the fabric of the relationship between the two protagonists reminded me in a vibrant, if very tenuous manner of my relationship with Steven . In fact, that connection was so tenuous in so many ways that it would be too esoteric to explain in a concise manner. Except the hooded merganser.

 

It reminds me of how what we enjoy watching or reading, or listening to is tightly tied to where we have been and where we are in our lives. A book we read when we are 15 might well not have the same effect at 50, or it might have more. All the strands of our experience are tied to where we are, as each new experience arises. Previous experiences modify the new, and the new experience modifies the previous.

 

My favorite movie is Terrence Malick’s Tree of Live. A brilliant, moody, moving, astounding work of art, and yet I hesitate to recommend it to others. It is problematic, given its nonlinear narrative, the visual symbolism and the use of nearly whispered voice overs to convey important themes. For me, all the strands in the film pulled together; my love of science, history, philosophy and theology converged with a time line closely aligned to my own life. It was a staggering experience and moves me still each time I watch it.

 

I would have enjoyed and appreciated The Fool of New York CIty even if it had not echoed my relationship with a lost friend. The prose was clear and masterful, the story moving and well told. It was all there. Then came the hooded merganser. I laughed out loud while reading when the bird made its first appearance. Then, I actually shed some tears when it made its last.

 

I think my heart would have burst if a dwarf nandina had crossed the stage. As it was, The Fool of New York City was a gift to me. Many would see the pulling together of all those strands as mere coincidence. I can see where they might. For me? No, there was more at work than chance. It was a gift given to me by God, I can feel it in a transcendent manner. A gift from God by way of O’Brien’s words. Mr. O’Brien did not mean to give me a gift. I suspect he would be happy to know he did, but what he intended was to be a channel through which God’s love flowed.
Every book, every movie, every song, every piece of artwork is a chance. A chance that we might be edified in an act of sub-creation. Those gifts make life well worth living.

Classic Catholic Fiction Book Club To Feature Tobit’s Dog

 

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St. Paul The Apostle Catholic Church, Corner of Columbus Avenue & West 60th Street, New York, NY  will be having a discussion of Tobit’s Dog on October 24th from 6:30 to 8:30 PM in the Parish center.

St. Paul The Apostle is the Mother Church of the Paulist Fathers. RSVP information is available in the link below. Scroll down for announcement and RSVP link.

https://www.stpaultheapostle.org/events_saintpaul.php